The process gave us deadlines and helped us focus on some important areas needing improvement.

Joe Wyse

The old proverb says: “It is the wise man who knows there is much he does not know.” In essence, making a commitment to improve oneself isn’t an admission of weakness – it’s an affirmation of strength.

This philosophy is, according to Shasta College President Joe Wyse, what makes IEPI so effective and unique.

“The team coming to the college is clearly coming with an attitude of helpfulness and from a desire to improve,” says Wyse, who has both hosted and led Partnership Resource Team (PRT) visits. “[It’s not about] admitting problems and weaknesses, but truly helping a college focus on areas that, when improved, will help student success.”

With so many complex factors at play – political, economic, environmental, procedural – improving college success is anything but easy. The strength of IEPI is that it works from the ground up, developing individual solutions that pave the way for big-picture goals.

“Basically, it gave us reason to be able to focus on what [author] Stephen Covey calls ‘the important but not urgent’ category,” says Wyse. “The process gave us deadlines and helped us focus on some important areas needing improvement.”